Tuesday, January 19, 2010

After All My Sons...A Different Drum....

Carl Rossi advocates for something very different...

The Huntington’s magnificent production of Arthur Miller’s ALL MY SONS justifies my long-unspoken belief that Boston’s leading theatre should cease its cautious attempts to keep up with the times and become, instead, a Museum of the American Drama, presenting classic and forgotten American plays from the 1920s to the 1950s --- the old-fashioned three-act, one set, fourth-wall kind, done with taste and strictly in period --- not only would such fare satisfy its Old Guard audiences (who ripple like wheat in the wind over obscenities and nudity), but also artists/lovers of the drama who deserve to see it rather than making do with reading it. No doubt these thoughts will fall on deaf Huntington ears, but I shall bang my drum, openly and evermore, out in the wilderness that this is what the Old Girl can and should do; meanwhile, call its box office, won’t you --- two prominent local actors (NOT imported “names”) brilliantly guided by an acclaimed Miller director should be stimulus, enough. (When the applause that ends Act One sounds like the applause heard at curtain call, you know you’re seeing a winner!)

(...)

And I’m serious about the Museum of American Drama --- the proof is in the current pudding.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Theatre should NOT be a museum. EVER. If it were, it would cease to be a relevant, vital art-form. I'm not surprised that such a stupid idea would emanate from Carl Rossi: he is a pompous, pathetic, talent-less, bullying, old-fashioned, narcissistic, egotisical windbag who loves only himself and hates anything new or different. Reading his "reviews" is like being strapped into an uncomfortable antique chair, being transported back in time to a dusty, dank, abandoned library in 1930, where you are tortured by a sadistic, pedantic Santa Claus.

Art said...

Aannd, while the first part of Anon's comment is relevant, (thank you for commenting) and I would love to hear more...the second part has finally convinced me to stop allowing anonymous comments on my blog.

Art said...

Not to mention, Rossi is having some fun with the term Museum. The fact is, he agrees with YOU.

His point is that the Huntington seems to be able, lately, to bring some 20th century classics to incredible vitality.

He is being hyperbolic on purpose. While I don't agree with him that the Huntington should abandone the production of New Works entirely, I do see his point.

Thomas Garvey said...

The only hitch in his argument is that the Huntington did not actually give All My Sons a completely traditional production. His point is a good one - I've said much the same thing myself - but still, at the Huntington's All My Sons we're not quite looking at a quaint "three-act, fourth-wall" show.

Thomas Garvey said...

And I do wonder (although I hardly want to see anonymous re-appear): why, precisely, should theatre never EVER be a museum? As a critic, I see over and over again the phenomenon of audiences responding more to masterpieces, done traditionally (and well), than to either new plays or avant-garde renderings of classic texts. There is a coterie of people, I admit, who insist that this isn't true; how they manage to continue "not seeing" what's right before their eyes, I've no idea. But regardless of the reasons for their blindness, why should the rest of us pay them any attention? No other art has come as much under the sway of this kind of propaganda as theatre has - except perhaps the visual arts, which have also, perhaps not coincidentally, gone into the crapper.