Friday, October 15, 2004

Sonia Flew Reviews Coming In...

Nothing sneaky going on here. I have a vague suspicion that if Sonia Flew was imported from New York or the South Coast Rep that some of the structural flaws would be overlooked and Lopez would be hailed a little more strongly. However, I have no evidence from these reviews to support that suspicion.

I am waiting to see what the Mirror and IRNE Reviews Look Like, but for now it is on to the Big Dogs...

Ed Siegel liked the performances and gives Martin props for the direction and goes on to say...

"But it's Lopez who deserves the primary credit for the presentation of such an intriguing slice of life. I don't know that "Sonia Flew" is a play for the ages, but it's certainly a play for our age. The first act is in keeping with several recent novels about immigration and assimilation, such as Gish Jen's "The Love Wife" and Jhumpa Lahiri's "The Namesake." "Sonia Flew" is more artful than either of those highly touted books.In Lopez's earlier work you can sense a struggle over her Cuban roots versus her American upbringing. She is still raising questions about ethnocentrism and assimilation, about Castro and capitalism, but it all seems more integrated now -- the writing, the voice, the sense of structure."

I have to say that I have not heard of Gish Jen or Jhumpa Lahiri. I have heard of the American Repertory Theatre though and Mr. Seigel provides his signature trademark by putting a little ART reference in...

"LeBow's comic timing almost always lights sparks at the American Repertory Theatre, and he provides the same service here."

WBUR's Bill Marx congratulates the Huntington, makes a call for more Boston premieres, gives some praise, but had problems with the depth and the structure a little:

Here Lopez is content to present rather than dig into larger themes: the clash between immigrant and mainstream America, the past and the present, parent and child. The ending in particular fizzles because Lopez does not bother to explore the inner lives of Sonia and Zak, to let them articulate what they have learned through pain.

Terry Byrne also liked the play but she also had more quibbles with the structure and the ending:

"But Lopez asks us to make a leap of faith that she hasn't quite earned. In the end, Lopez offers Sonia a kind of redemption that is a relief, but not as satisfying as it should be."


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